Maternity Leave Laws in the United States in the Light of European Legislation

Title

Maternity Leave Laws in the United States in the Light of European Legislation

Files

Description

This chapter describes the difficulty that the US has had in passing social legislation by viewing it through the changing attitudes of US Supreme Court justices toward employment legislation during five defining eras in the twentieth century: laissez-faire economics and wage and hour legislation, 1905-1941; President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal Social Security Act, 1935-1937; World War II, 1940-1948; the Civil Rights and Women’s movements, 1963-1978; and the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. The US has expanded its view of government’s role in the private workplace over time, though not nearly as quickly as has Europe. The author shows that this lagging behind may be explained in part by America’s long tradition of opposing government power, particularly Federal power, and, in the case of maternity leave, by unhelpful attitudes toward women in the workplace, both of which have stifled social engineering initiatives in the United States.

Publication Date

1-1-2008

Keywords

Maternity leave, Family leave, Employment law, Social legislation, US Supreme Court

Disciplines

Labor and Employment Law

Maternity Leave Laws in the United States in the Light of European Legislation

Share

COinS