Title

State Terrorism in Hungary: The Case of Friendly Repression

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

December 1982

Volume

1982

Issue

54

First Page

77

Last Page

86

Abstract

Hungary is often portrayed as a refreshingly liberal contrast to other Soviet bloc regimes of Eastern Europe. This sentiment is reflected in both the scholarly and popular press with depressing regularity. For example, Völgyes, a prolific Hungarologist writes in Current History that Hungary “has become a relatively free, liberal country…one of the few Communists states that has no political prisoners…” And Don Cook, writing for the Los Angeles Times says that “…the atmosphere in Budapest is totally devoid of repression or fear.” Indeed, Hungary is different from other East European regimes. It boasts a relatively smoothly functioning economy, a popular leader, and a reasonably satisfied and well-fed population.

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